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36 True/False questions

  1. Second-Order ThinkingOrdinary thinking (Paul and Elder term).

          

  2. SociocentrismThe tendency to view everything in relationship to oneself and to regard one's own opinions, values, or interests as important.

          

  3. Weak-Sense Critical ThinkingThinking that uses critical thinking skills to evaluate all beliefs, especially one's own, and that pursues what is intellectually fair and just.

          

  4. FeelingAllocates energy into action and does so consistent with how we define what is desirable and possible. Continually tells us what is or is not worth seeking or getting.

          

  5. WantingMonitors the meanings created by thinking, evaluates the degree to which life's events are either positive or negative given the meaning we assign to them, and continually informs us how we should respond emotionally to what is happening in our lives.

          

  6. Critical Thinking Dimension 1Analyzing one's own thinking -- breaking it down into its component parts.

          

  7. Intellectual UnfairnessFeeling no responsibility to represent disagreeing viewpoints with fairness or accuracy, always sees itself as just and right, and often involves self-deception.

          

  8. EgocentrismThe assumption that one's own social group is inherently superior to all others.

          

  9. Intellectual ArroganceOverestimation of one's own knowledge and no insight into self-deception or the limitations of one's viewpoint. The opposite of intellectual humility.

          

  10. Intellectual CourageConfronting ideas, viewpoints, or beliefs with fairness, examining fairly beliefs which one has strong negative feelings and toward which one has previously been dismissive, and challenging popular belief. The opposite of intellectual cowardice.

          

  11. Intellectual EmpathyCommitment to discovering the extent of one's own ignorance, that one does not and cannot know everything, awareness of one's biases and prejudices and viewpoint limitations, recognition that one should only claim what one actually knows, and awareness that egocentrism is often self-deceiving. The opposite of intellectual arrogance.

          

  12. Strong-Sense Critical ThinkingThinking that does not consider counter viewpoints, that lacks fair-mindedness, and that uses critical thinking skills simply to defend current beliefs.

          

  13. Intellectual PerserveranceWorking one's way through intellectual complexities despite frustrations inherent in doing so, reasoning through issues carefully and methodically, and following rational principles instead of initial impressions and simplistic answers. The opposite of intellectual laziness.

          

  14. The Functions of the MindOrdinary thinking (Paul and Elder term).

          

  15. ThinkingAllocates energy into action and does so consistent with how we define what is desirable and possible. Continually tells us what is or is not worth seeking or getting.

          

  16. Higher-Order ThinkingOrdinary thinking (Paul and Elder term).

          

  17. Intellectual DishonestyMarked by contradictions and inconsistencies of which one is unconscious, hiding one's own hypocrisy, and regarding oneself as fair even when expecting others to follow much more rigorous standards. The opposite of intellectual integrity.

          

  18. Intellectual Distrust of ReasonLack of confidence in reason. Inclines one to assert the truth through one's own beliefs regardless of flaws. The opposite of confidence in reason.

          

  19. Intellectual Self-CenterednessFeeling no responsibility to represent disagreeing viewpoints with fairness or accuracy, always sees itself as just and right, and often involves self-deception.

          

  20. Intellectual ConformityHolding oneself to the same rigorous intellectual standard that one expects others to meet, admitting flaws in one's own thinking, and identifying weaknesses in one's own thinking. The opposite of intellectual dishonesty.

          

  21. The Critical Thinking ApproachNot something you add onto everything else, but rather, the way you approach everything you do.

          

  22. Intellectual AutonomyCommitment to discovering the extent of one's own ignorance, that one does not and cannot know everything, awareness of one's biases and prejudices and viewpoint limitations, recognition that one should only claim what one actually knows, and awareness that egocentrism is often self-deceiving. The opposite of intellectual arrogance.

          

  23. FallaciesFlaws or errors in reasoning which, when found in the premise of an argument, invalidate its conclusion.

          

  24. Intellectual IntegrityHolding oneself to the same rigorous intellectual standard that one expects others to meet, admitting flaws in one's own thinking, and identifying weaknesses in one's own thinking. The opposite of intellectual dishonesty.

          

  25. Critical Thinking Dimension 2Improving one's own thinking -- reconstructing it to make it better.

          

  26. First-Order ThinkingThinking which is deep and highly insightful.

          

  27. Intellectual HumilityCommitment to discovering the extent of one's own ignorance, that one does not and cannot know everything, awareness of one's biases and prejudices and viewpoint limitations, recognition that one should only claim what one actually knows, and awareness that egocentrism is often self-deceiving. The opposite of intellectual arrogance.

          

  28. SophistryThe ability to win an argument regardless of flaws in its reasoning.

          

  29. Critical Thinking Dimension 3Analyzing one's own thinking -- breaking it down into its component parts.

          

  30. Intellectual CowardiceFear of ideas that do not conform to one's own, dismisses ideas, beliefs, or viewpoints perceived as dangerous, and threatened ideas conflicting with one's own self-identity. The opposite of intellectual courage.

          

  31. The Critical Thinking DimensionsAnalyzing, evaluating, and improving one's own critical thinking.

          

  32. Intellectual LazinessFeeling no responsibility to represent disagreeing viewpoints with fairness or accuracy, always sees itself as just and right, and often involves self-deception.

          

  33. StereotypeThe ability to win an argument regardless of flaws in its reasoning.

          

  34. Tactics for Improving Critical ThinkingThinking that uses critical thinking skills to evaluate all beliefs, especially one's own, and that pursues what is intellectually fair and just.

          

  35. Confidence in ReasonThe assumption that one's own social group is inherently superior to all others.

          

  36. Fair-MindednessFlaws or errors in reasoning which, when found in the premise of an argument, invalidate its conclusion.